Mindy Kaling Says Coca-Cola Tastes So Good At A Certain Place

According to some, there’s a place where Coca-Cola tastes so good. Go ahead and Google it. Yes, that place is McDonald’s. Here’s a lil’ article about why it tastes so good at McDonald’s.

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AARP and Ad Council: Danny Trejo Shows That Male Caregivers Are Still Manly

Caregiving is seen as a female task. But in the United States, about 40% of unpaid family caregivers are men. In this AARP/Ad Council spot created by DDB New York, manliest of men Danny Trejo does ridiculously tough stuff, but they aren’t quite as tough as a middle-aged guy caring for his elderly father. Here’s more from Adweek.

Tuesday Throwback: Chase Sapphire, An Expensive Dress, And Frank Sinatra’s “The Way You Look Tonight”

A lot of these Tuesday Throwback posts come from hearing a song that triggers a commercial memory. Frank Sinatra’s “The Way You Look Tonight” is an absolutely beautiful song. This 2009 Chase Sapphire commercial evokes some of the class of that tune by showing a kinda wealthy looking married couple, with the man explaining that they can use their Chase Sapphire points to “take a break.” Two problems with this spot though: first, the dialogue sounds too much like an ad, and not how regular people would talk. Second, the revelation that the wife used their points on a dress, albeit a rather attractive one, is pretty obnoxious. The husband is played by David Starzyk, and the wife is Molly Culver. Here’s the dress commercial, and a few more featuring the same couple from this campaign.

 

LeBron James Is Also A Crying, Bearded Baby In This Intel Commercial

Well…that was something. I’m thinking the baby image of LeBron will become a meme, if it isn’t already.

Carl’s Jr. And Hardee’s: Food, Not Boobs

Carl’s Jr. has a long history of using sex in its commercials. I’ve written about a few of their sexy spots on here. But now that time has passed. Carl’s Jr. (and Hardee’s) have decided to focus on food, not boobs. In this 3-minute ad created by 72andSunny, the “founder” Carl Hardee Sr. (played by Charles Esten) returns to the company and brings it back to basics. Here’s more from Advertising Age.

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