Extra Gum’s Emotional Origami Commercial

Appealing to emotions is a crucial part of advertising, and this can be especially true in more “boring” categories. If an advertisement can assign a sentimental value to something that is typically thought of as practical, it’s a great strategic advantage. This is very apparent in a new commercial from Extra Gum, created by Energy BBDO Chicago. Gum might not be the most exciting item, and its sales have been falling in recent years. So Extra falls on its classic identity of a long-lasting gum in an unexpected way.

The spot starts with a father teaching his young daughter how to make a paper crane with his gum wrapper, and she starts making her own. Time marches on, and the birds become something of a collector’s item for the girl as she grows up. Finally, the parents are packing the car to send her off to college, when the father drops a box…and then finds that it’s full of paper cranes. If that was a reference to the thousand paper cranes legend, it’s a great one. The ad closes with a voiceover saying “sometimes the little things last the longest.” Overall, the spot has a similar message (though a less beautiful execution) to Vodafone’s ad from earlier this year. It’s a nice, sweet, sentimental commercial. Is it a little sappy? Yep. But a little sap isn’t so bad sometimes.

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About joshw24
30 year old guy. Into sports, pop culture, advertising, and trivia among other things.

13 Responses to Extra Gum’s Emotional Origami Commercial

  1. margaret says:

    love that comercial

    • Abraham says:

      If anybody could answer my question in the next 12 hours, that would be great.
      My question exactly is, who do y’all believe this commercial MAINLY APPEALS to? Is it younger people, such a daughters. Or is it directed to Fathers who have daughters? Also why, would they make this commercial so sentimental? I don’t understand who this is supposed to appeal to the most?

  2. Pingback: What You Really Need This Weekend | Our Vintage Life

  3. Keyla says:

    What’s the name of the song in the background?!!!

    • Abraham says:

      If anybody could answer my question in the next 12 hours, that would be great.
      My question exactly is, who do y’all believe this commercial MAINLY APPEALS to? Is it younger people, such a daughters. Or is it directed to Fathers who have daughters? Also why, would they make this commercial so sentimental? I don’t understand who this is supposed to appeal to the most?

    • Liz says:

      It’s Serpentine by Chris Bathgate. I had heard it on Pandora before and about drove myself nuts trying to find it there. Then I remembered the song name and I was able to get it on YouTube.

  4. Mozelle Portwood says:

    I don’t think she starts making her own, I think she has kept every one her dad has made her over the years.. It’s like holding on to little I love you’s from her dad, unspoken but even more powerful without words.

  5. Elayne says:

    If you noticed it was the father making and presenting the paper cranes to his daughter.

  6. Abraham says:

    If anybody could answer my question in the next 12 hours, that would be great.
    My question exactly is, who do y’all believe this commercial MAINLY APPEALS to? Is it younger people, such a daughters. Or is it directed to Fathers who have daughters? Also why, would they make this commercial so sentimental? I don’t understand who this is supposed to appeal to the most?

    • joshw24 says:

      Personally, I think the appeal is to parents, both fathers and mothers. Gum isn’t a really exciting item, but Extra told an emotional narrative that is different than what you’d expect. You look at it as more than as gum, but as something that creates small moments in our lives. And as the ad says “sometimes the little things last the longest.”

  7. David W says:

    I think it reminds us that little things can mean a lot. Gum is not an amazing or expensive gift. Making a crane out of origami takes no money and takes little time to make (if you know how to make it. It draws the parallel that these seemingly small things/moments that a parent shares or creates for a child can be some of the most powerful and memorable moments to a child. Two of my most powerful memories as a child have nothing to do with Disneyland or a new bike. It’s pretending to be asleep in the car so that my dad would carry me into the house because I didn’t want to walk. And strangely enough, I remember that my grandmother always kept her gum in her purse. And her purse was always kept in her hope chest…so I have this distinct memory of her getting me gum…and she would open the hope chest and I could smell the pine wood mixed with the spearmint gum. Those moments will always mean more to me than getting a Hot Wheel car or a trip to an amusement park.

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